Jasminum odoratissimum

Jasminum odoratissimum

Jasmines are to be recommended for bringing fragrance into the garden in the warmer months. They belong to the Oleaceae family of plants and there are more than 200 species of them, native mainly to tropical and warm temperate regions of the world (particularly South and South-East Asia), thus they are quite well suited to our Sydney climate and a number of them thrive here. They have either a climbing or shrubby habit, though some - such as this one - can grow as either. It bears a profusion of tiny golden flowers on a fence in my garden in summer and grows to around 2-2.5 m. Its name might lead one to expect it to be the most fragrant of all jasmines, but though it has a pretty scent, I wouldn't say it is the strongest of all in the genus. It is an uncommon species, however, and I enjoy its glossy evergreen leaves and bright flowers: it grows nearby a robust specimen of Duranta 'Sheena's Gold', echoing the hue of its bright foliage. Jasminum odoratissimum comes from Madeira and the Canary Islands. It can be pruned back after flowering and propagated from cuttings in spring or autumn. It grows best in a sunny position with well-drained soil.

Flowers in January, February, March.