Colocasia esculenta

Colocasia esculenta

Colocasia esculenta (ht 1.5m), from tropical East Asia, is sometimes referred to as 'elephant's ears'. The resemblance is rather remarkable and these imposing foliage plants can really make a statement in a garden. These plants belong to the broad plant family known as the Araceae, the members of which are sometimes known as aroids. Many of these plants come from tropical climates and were traditionally used as houseplants. However, in Sydney we can grow many of them outdoors as permanent plantings, or in pots. On the whole, they are best suited to shadier parts of the garden, with sufficient moisture: many can actually grow well in ponds. They can introduce an element of bold contrast with their distinctive leaves and flowers, and mix in well with other warm-climate plants that grow well here, creating the ambience of a tropical rain forest.

Colocasia Black Magic

The basic species of Colocasia has enormous, deep green arrowhead-shaped leaves, which provide a very satisfying contrast to ferny, strappy or grass-like foliage in the garden. Their flowers are not very showy. I find the dark velvety leaves of the cultivar 'Black Magic' to be the closest to real elephant's ears in terms of colour! There is a lovely lime-gold cultivar and there are also patterned forms, such as 'Illustris', which are very beautiful. The fancier cultivars seem a bit more cold sensitive than the basic species and can die back a bit in winter; they are certainly not at their best at that time. In cold gardens, they are probably best grown in pots and moved under shelter in the cooler months. Propagation is by division of the tubers or by runners that may develop from the parent plant.